2019-2020 Scholarship Recipients

CTRF wishes to thank the sponsors of the current scholarship program, without whom these awards would not be possible. They include CN, Transport Canada, and other corporate and individual contributors.
Thank you.

CN:
Seyedkianoush Mousavichashmi – University of Toronto
Jacqueline Young – University of New Brunswick

Transport Canada:
Rushdi Mah’d Alsaleh – University of British Columbia
Gamal Eldeeb – McMaster University
Mohamed Elsayed – McMaster University
Patrick Meredith-Karam – Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Passant Reyad – University of British Columbia (Unable to Accept)
Michael Olfert – University of Manitoba (Unable to Accept)

 


CN Scholarship $4,500

Seyedkianoush Mousavichashmi – University of Toronto


CN Scholarship $4,500

Jacqueline Young – University of New Brunswick

Jacqueline is an MScE student at the University of New Brunswick conducting research with the UNB Transportation Group in the Department of Civil Engineering. Her thesis research is focused on developing collision prediction models for rural New Brunswick highways. Poisson regression analyses will be used to model the effect of independent variables on number of collisions to statistically determine the appropriate variables to be included. The empirically based models will be used to objectively identify locations in the road network that are under-performing in terms of safety. The process of network screening is a state-of-the-art practice to determine the most cost-effective locations to be treated with road safety countermeasures to reduce crash frequencies and severities. This research will provide a better method of prioritizing road safety concerns that cause collisions along New Brunswick’s road network.


Transport Canada Scholarship $6,000

Rushdi Mah’d Alsaleh – University of British Columbia

Rushdi Alsaleh received his M.Sc. degree in civil engineering working on a joint project of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) between Kuwait University (ABET Accredited) and the University of British Columbia (UBC) in 2016. He received his B.Sc in civil engineering from the same university within 3.5 years with MGPA 4/4, and was ranked as one of the top students in the university. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in transportation engineering at the University of British Columbia (UBC). His research is focused on road safety, active and sustainable transportation, Intelligent Transportation System (ITS), and traffic simulation and modeling. He has been working as a research assistant at the Bureau of Intelligent Transportation Systems and Freight Security (BITSAFS-Engineering) at UBC since 2016. Currently, he is working on developing a simulation tool for mixed traffic in shared spaces. Modeling the behaviour of vulnerable road users (cyclists and pedestrians) in shared spaces is important to better accommodate them and evaluate their safety at different design outlines and at early design stages. He participated in several national and international road safety and traffic operation projects in various cities across Canada (Vancouver, Kamloops, and Edmonton) and the Middle East (Kuwait). From his work and research in transportation engineering, he co-authored several publications and received awards including the Canadian Transportation Research Forum (CTRF)/Transport Canada. His research work on pedestrian distraction and safety was featured in many national and international news outlets including the New York Times, TreeHugger, CBC, and CTV.


Transport Canada Scholarship $6,000

Gamal Eldeeb – McMaster University

Gamal is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Civil Engineering, McMaster University since January 2018. He is currently working under the supervision of Dr. Moataz Mohamed. His research aims to evaluate, and further optimize, the quality of public transit service through achieving two overarching objectives; Benchmarking transit service desired quality, and Transit service reconfiguration using an agent-based modelling approach. Regarding the first objective, the research employs state-of-the-art choice modelling techniques, such as Hybrid Choice Models (HCM), Latent class Choice Models (LCM), Random Parameter Logit (RPL) models, and multinomial logit (MNL), to quantify preference heterogeneity in transit service desired quality. For the second objective, the study utilizes a network science approach to assess transit network robustness and vulnerability. Moreover, the research adopts a multicriteria spatial analytics approach to evaluate transit stops considering stop importance, physical accessibility, and stop utilization. These are used in an agent-based model to arrive at an optimal transit network reconfiguration.”


Transport Canada Scholarship $6,000

Mohamed Elsayed – McMaster University

Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the potential to revolutionize several industries. UAVs are battery operated, which makes them an affordable and sustainable aerial transportation system. However, UAV operation is constrained to flight time/range due to battery capacity, which leads to significant limitations on its utilization within the transportation/freight context. Furthermore, given the fact that UAVs have limited processing ability onboard, and with the vulnerability of processor/sensor damage, a precise preplanned flight path is imperative at high flight speeds to avoid physical collision hazards. This extreme risk of collision and fatalities correlated with integrating UAVs within cities, necessitates the design process to start with simulating infrastructure design alternatives to test numerous missions and tasks to facilitate the mission control portion. In this project, we propose a system design toolbox aimed at achieving five major contributions. First, we develop a unified open-source platform for autonomous UAV mission simulation with a simple visual interface. Second, the toolbox integrates several UAV path planning, mission control and queuing algorithms in a single choice model. Third, the toolbox integrates a high definition 3D GIS model coupled with external factors in UAV mission planning (e.g. NFZ and weather updates). Fourth, the proposed toolbox provides a testbed for comparing several potential infrastructure UAV traffic network and facility design methodologies (graph or path based) for autonomous UAVs. By integrating a high-definition 3D GIS and climate data, the tool box enables the simulation of solar and wind energy potential in urban settings. This will be utilized for the allocation of solar and wind powered wireless power transfer (WPT) battery charging stations along critical routes and on optimized intervals. The proposed toolbox will extend drone fleet range while eliminating reliability on power grid especially during peak demand, diminishing charging cost and traffic congestion. Furthermore, the proposed integrated system is expected to reduce the transportation carbon footprint by 0.02 tons per 100 km of substituted travelled delivery.


Transport Canada Scholarship $6,000

Patrick Meredith-Karam – Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Patrick is a dual degree candidate in the Master of Science in Transportation and the Technology & Policy Program the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Patrick holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering Science degree from the University of Toronto, where he pursued the Infrastructure major and specialized his study in Transportation. Patrick has focused previous research on improving transit assignment for travel behaviour models, modelling transit fare integration, and developing methods for heterogenous delivery fleet vehicle routing. Patrick also has internship experience as a transit technology consultant with IBI Group in Toronto, where he was awarded the 2017 first place “Campus Connext Award” for his work in “contributing to defining the cities of tomorrow.”

In his Master’s degree research, Patrick will be participating in real-world collaborative projects with the MIT Transit Lab. These projects take the form of long-term partnerships with transit agencies, currently including Transport for London, Chicago Transit Authority, and Hong Kong MTA. Research projects often focus on areas including transportation modelling, service and operations planning, and transit policy, finance and strategy. Additionally, Patrick will continue some of the research projects which he began at the University of Toronto. In October 2019, Patrick will present a project at the International Urban Freight Conference (I-NUF) in Long Beach, California, entitled “Express Package Delivery Optimization Using On-Foot Personnel, Cargo Tricycles and Delivery Trucks: A Case Study for Downtown Toronto.”